Part B: Our work in detail

1 Governance
​Pārongo ā-tāone

Governance is about democratic local decision-making on behalf of the people of Wellington. Our governance activities include managing local elections, informing residents about the city and the issues or challenges it faces, listening to residents’ views, making decisions in the best interests of the city and its people, and managing partnerships with mana whenua and other groups.

This work is essential for local democracy and for the quality of Council decision-making. Residents have a fundamental right to influence the makeup of the Council through elections, and to be informed about, and influence, Council decision-making. Public input and involvement improve the quality of decision-making by ensuring that all points of view and all relevant information are considered.

Our partnerships with mana whenua recognise their special place in the city’s history and special relationships with its land, waterways and other parts of its environment.

The Local Government Act 2002 sets out the decision-making, planning and accountability procedures expected of councils. Other legislation requires us to keep a record of our work and provide access to the information that we hold. Our City Archives team looks after and makes available a huge range of primary information about the city’s history. We also operate a 24/7 contact centre so we can provide people with information and respond to their requests relating to our services.

Key projects

Giving effect to the Long-term plan 2015–25

It’s the Council’s job to meet the current and future needs of communities for local infrastructure, public services and regulatory functions in the most cost-effective way. The LTP was adopted in June 2015 and sets out the Council’s intentions for the decade ahead. During 2016/17 an amendment to the LTP will be progressed to reflect the changes to the plan from the Council’s decisions on the Movie Museum and Convention Centre proposal.

Local body elections

The local body elections are held every 3 years throughout New Zealand and the next Election Day is Saturday 8 October 2016. Elections will be held for the Mayor, 14 Councillors (who are elected from five wards) and Community Board members for the Tawa and Makara-Ohariu Community Boards. Nominations for these positions will be open from 15 July to 12 August.

Wellington has used the Single Transferrable Vote (STV) voting system since 2002. Under this system voters rank their preferred candidates with a number, and candidates are elected by reaching the “quota” – the number of votes required to be elected – which is based on the total number of votes and the number of vacant positions.

Voting documents will be posted out to all electors who are enrolled from 16 September. The voting period is approximately 3 weeks. Voters fill out the form and post the voting document back by 12 noon on Saturday 8 October. A progress result is generally expected by late afternoon on Saturday 8 October.

Pre-election report

Before each local body election, the Chief Executive must produce a pre-election report summarising the major projects planned for the following 3 years along with financial information on rates, rates increases and borrowing. The pre-election report is expected to be released on 29 July.

Digitisation of information

We have a requirement to digitise paper files so that we can respond to internal and external requests with digital documents and move to design and delivery of end-to-end digital services.

Council digitisation is delivered by a digitisation service established on-site at City Archives that will operate through to at least 30 June 2020. This service specialises in digitising paper files while preserving the paper original. These types of files are being digitised as they are used or if they are at risk from overuse. At the same time an off-site outsourced arrangement is used to buy one-off digitisation projects where the paper originals are no longer required.

Statement on Māori and mana whenuaTop

Our Treaty obligations

Wellington City Council is involved in numerous activities that provide a platform for engagement with local iwi and the wider Māori community. We are also subject to a wide range of legal obligations and Te Tiriti o Waitangi considerations, including Memoranda of Understanding with local mana whenua iwi entities – Port Nicholson Block Settlement Trust and Te Rūnanga o Toa Rangatira Incorporated.

Mana whenua partnerships and iwi support

The legal obligations may be the foundations for organisational policy and delivery but on their own they don’t adequately emphasise the importance of Te Tiriti, the partnership with Māori and the critical value that this unique relationship can bring to the city both domestically and internationally.

As such, we will work to ensure the past, present and future role of Māori in our city will be valued and reflected in all aspects of our work, including urban design, economic development, resource management, social wellbeing, arts, culture and recreation.

Governance – group of activitiesTop

GROUP OF ACTIVITIES RATIONALE SERVICE OFFERING NEGATIVE EFFECTS
1.1 Governance, information and engagement

1.1.1 City governance and engagement

1.1.2 Civic information

1.1.3 City Archives
Facilitating democratic decision-making

Providing open access to information
  • Providing advice, research and administrative support to elected members and community boards
  • Hosting local body elections
  • A call centre and website providing 24/7 access to information and a place to log service faults
  • Management of archival information in line with legislation
  • Facilitating engagement on key issues and input from advisory groups
  • Accountability planning and reporting
There are no significant negative effects from these activities.
1.2 Māori and mana whenua partnerships

1.2.1 Māori and mana whenua partnerships
Partnership and recognition of the special place of mana whenua
  • Maintaining formal relationships with two mana whenua partners
  • Facilitating opportunities to contribute to local decision-making
There are no significant negative effects from these activities.

Governance – performance measuresTop

GOVERNANCE
Objectives Democratic decision-making

Open access to information

Recognition of Māori
Outcome indicators Residents (%) who agree that decisions are made in the best interests of the city

Residents (%) who state that they understand how the Council makes decisions

Residents (%) who understand how they can have input into Council decision-making

Mana whenua partners agree that the use and protection of the city's resources for the future is appropriate

Residents (%) who believe they have the opportunity to participate in city life

Voter turnout in local elections, referendums and polls
 
1.1 Governance, information and engagement

1.1.1 City governance and engagement

1.1.2 Civic information

1.1.3 City Archives
 
PURPOSE OF MEASURE PERFORMANCE MEASURE 2016/17 2017/18 2018–25
To measure the quality of the public's involvement in Council decision-making Residents (%) satisfaction with the level of consultation (ie the right amount) 55% 55% 55%
Residents (%) who are satisfied or neutral (neither satisfied nor dissatisfied) with regard to their involvement with decision-making 75% 75% 75%
To measure the quality and timeliness of residents' access to information Council and committee agendas (%) are made available to the public within statutory timeframes (2 working days prior to the meeting) 100% 100% 100%
Council and committee agendas (%) that are made available to elected members 5 days prior to the meeting and to the public four days prior to the meeting 80% 80% 80%
Residents (%) who agree that Council information is easy to access (eg from the website, libraries, newspapers, etc) 55% 60% Increasing trend
Residents (%) who agree that the Council website is easy to navigate and get information from 70% 75% 75%
Contact Centre response times – calls (%) answered within 30 seconds 80% 80% 80%
Contact Centre response times – emails (%) responded to within 24 hours 100% 100% 100%
 
1.2 Māori and mana whenua partnerships

1.2.1 Māori and mana whenua partnerships
 
PURPOSE OF MEASURE PERFORMANCE MEASURE 2016/17 2017/18 2018–25
To measure the health of our relationships with mana whenua Mana whenua partner satisfaction with Council relationship (satisfied and very satisfied) Satisfied Satisfied Satisfied
To measure the engagement of the city's Māori residents Māori residents (%) who are satisfied or neutral (neither satisfied nor dissatisfied) with regard to their involvement with decision-making 75% 75% 75%

Governance – activity budgetTop

1.1 GOVERNANCE, INFORMATION AND ENGAGEMENT 2015/16
LTP
GROSS EXPENDITURE
2016/17
ANNUAL PLAN
GROSS EXPENDITURE
Operating expenditure ($000) ($000)
1.1.1 – City governance and engagement 9,901 10,909
1.1.2 – Civic information 5,435 5,542
1.1.3 – City Archives 1,758 1,967
Total operating expenditure 17,094 18,418
Capital expenditure ($000) ($000)
1.1.1 – City governance and engagement - 116
1.1.2 – Civic information - -
1.1.3 – City Archives - -
Total capital expenditure - 116
1.2 Māori and mana whenua partnerships 2015/16
LTP
GROSS EXPENDITURE
2016/17
ANNUAL PLAN
GROSS EXPENDITURE
Operating expenditure ($000) ($000)
1.2.1 – Māori and mana whenua partnerships 281 295
Total operating expenditure 281 295
Capital expenditure ($000) ($000)
1.2.1 – Māori and mana whenua partnerships - -
Total capital expenditure - -